Meadowcroft to Host 22nd Annual Atlatl Competition

Visitors can try their hand at the prehistoric spear-thrower and watch atlatl pros compete for high score




Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village, part of the Smithsonian-affiliated Senator John Heinz History Center museum system, will host the 22nd Annual Meadowcroft Atlatl Competition on Saturday, June 15, from noon to 5 p.m.
 
Prehistoric hunters used a spear-thrower called the atlatl, a precursor to the bow and arrow, to hunt for food. The atlatl was carved from wood, antler, or bone and used to increase a spear’s force and velocity during the hunt for deer, elk, and other large animals.  
 
Visitors of all ages can learn proper atlatl technique from Meadowcroft staff and try out the prehistoric spear-thrower for themselves, then compete for high score in men’s, women’s, and youth divisions.
 
Presented annually in partnership with the World Atlatl Association, the Meadowcroft Atlatl Competition will feature some of the world’s top atlatl competitors.
 
Throughout the day, Meadowcroft visitors can also step inside a wigwam in Meadowcroft’s 16th-century Monongahela Indian Village and watch a blacksmith forge red-hot iron in the 19th-century Meadowcroft Village.
 
Also included with regular admission are tours of the Meadowcroft Rockshelter, a National Historic Landmark and the oldest site of human habitation in North America that features a massive rock overhang used by the region’s earliest inhabitants for shelter 19,000 years ago.
 
Admission is $15 for adults, $14 for senior citizens, and $7 for students and children ages 6-17. Children age 5 and under and History Center members get in free.
 
For more information, visit www.heinzhistorycenter.org/meadowcroft or call 724-587-3412.
 
Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village operates in association with the Senator John Heinz History Center, an affiliate of the Smithsonian and Pennsylvania’s largest history museum.  Meadowcroft, a National Historic Landmark, is the oldest site of human habitation in North America and features a massive rock overhang used by the region’s earliest inhabitants for shelter more than 19,000 years ago. The 16th century Monongahela Indian Village includes wigwams, recreated prehistoric artifacts, and hands-on activities related to agriculture. Two 18th century structures help to spotlight the similarities and differences between the everyday lives of European settlers and American Indians in the Upper Ohio Valley. Meadowcroft’s 19th century village features a covered bridge, one-room schoolhouse, blacksmith shop, and church that create a charming country village setting. Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village is located in Avella, Pa., Washington County, within an hour’s drive of Pittsburgh. For more, visitwww.heinzhistorycenter.org/meadowcroft.
 
 
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Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village in Avella, Washington County, will host its 22nd Annual Meadowcroft Atlatl Competition on Saturday, June 15 from noon to 5 p.m.
 
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Prehistoric hunters used a spear-thrower called the atlatl to hunt for food. Visitors to Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village can try it for themselves on Saturday, June 15.

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